Warrior I Pose

Warrior I (Figure 2.24) is a pose that generates a lot of heat and energy through the entire body. The legs are rooted into the ground and the energy is brought upwards through the arms. When performing Warrior I Pose, your child may be taught to think of himself as a fierce warrior, ready to bravely face any challenge or battle encountered.

On a physical level, this pose increases strength through the legs. It also opens the hips and may release a lot of energy that is held in the groin area. By reaching to the sky, the arms and shoulders are strengthened.

On an emotional level, your child's visualization as a warrior may increase his confidence. Once he is able to hold the pose for even a short period and begins to see himself as a warrior, he may begin to feel inner strength and success. This sense of accomplishment is important to a child with an ASD. Often they have physical limitations in strength, agility, or endurance that may make them feel like a failure during typical physical activities such as sports.

Your child can imagine himself as a fierce strong warrior who can face any challenge with bravery and ease. He can internalize the idea that he is a competent and unafraid challenger. He can also envision himself conquering foes and being a hero in general. Remind him that he should remember this pose when facing obstacles in life. He may summon the strength of the warrior at any time.

1. Stand at the front of the mat in Mountain Pose and take several deep breaths.

2. Turn on the mat and bring your legs about one leg's length distance apart. Turn your right foot out ninety degrees and your left foot in about forty-five degrees. Your right heel should be in line with your left foot arch.

3. Bend your right knee as deeply as possible to ninety degrees. As a modification, only bend the knee as far as is comfortable, even if it is only a slight bend. Bending the knee deeper will require leg strength, especially in the thigh area. This strength will build over time.

4. Keep the left foot rooted into the ground and be sure to press the whole foot into the mat to support the left leg as well as the whole body.

5. Raise your arms overhead, keeping them as straight as possible. The hands may remain shoulder distance apart or they may touch, whichever is most comfortable for your child. He should imagine a powerful force being brought up through his body and out of his hands. His hands and fingers should remain spread, to get energy and circulation through the hands and wrists. As a modification, the arms can remain at his sides until your child feels capable of raising his arms overhead.

6. The belly should be firm to help support the torso.

7. Take three to five breaths in this position and then lower the arms, straighten the legs and pivot the feet to the left. Repeat the pose on the left side and then come back into Mountain Pose at the front of your mat.

Warrior Kids Pose

Figure 2.24 Warrior I Pose Warrior II Pose

Warrior II Pose (Figure 2.25) has the same fierce leg stance as Warrior I but the arms are outstretched to the sides. The same leg strength is necessary for this pose, so your child will likely need some modifications initially. Although the pose is similar to Warrior I, your child should be encouraged not to skip this pose, because the feeling of freedom in the outstretched arms will invigorate him. However, if he absolutely cannot summon the strength to practice Warrior II in the beginning of his yoga practice, Child's Pose (see Calming poses) may be practiced, in order for him to rest for a few moments, before going onto the next pose.

Figure 2.24 Warrior I Pose Warrior II Pose

Warrior II Pose (Figure 2.25) has the same fierce leg stance as Warrior I but the arms are outstretched to the sides. The same leg strength is necessary for this pose, so your child will likely need some modifications initially. Although the pose is similar to Warrior I, your child should be encouraged not to skip this pose, because the feeling of freedom in the outstretched arms will invigorate him. However, if he absolutely cannot summon the strength to practice Warrior II in the beginning of his yoga practice, Child's Pose (see Calming poses) may be practiced, in order for him to rest for a few moments, before going onto the next pose.

You will need to judge how tired your child becomes while doing the poses. He may be encouraged, but not pushed beyond his endurance limit. Endurance will increase over time and does not need to be rushed, as yoga is something that may be practiced over a lifetime.

Your child can imagine being a warrior again, but this time with a specific goal in mind as he looks straight ahead past his outstretched arms. He can imagine conquering a fear as he directs his energy forward past his fingers. In addition, he can imagine the energy from the sun and sky pouring into his open chest.

He can also think about his arms extending out to the sides of the room, so he feels that he takes up a lot of space. It is important that children with ASDs feel that they are as important and worthwhile as children who do not have a disability. This pose may help a child understand that he takes up as much space, both physically and emotionally, as anyone else. His needs are as important as anyone's.

1. Come to the front of the mat in Mountain Pose and take a deep breath or two.

2. Spread your legs out on the mat about one leg's length distance apart. Turn your right foot out ninety degrees and your left foot in about forty-five degrees. Your right heel should be in line with your left arch.

3. Bend your right knee up to ninety degrees. Again, the knee should be bent only as far as comfortable, as this position requires much leg strength.

4. Press through the heels and balls of both feet to ground the body and the legs. Additionally, concentrate on putting some of your body weight on your back leg to take some of the weight off your front leg.

5. Your torso should be straight and strong.

6. Raise your arms out shoulder height and imagine that energy is coming through your arms to the front and back of the room. If your child cannot raise and hold his arms for any length of time, have him hold his arms outstretched for one second (Figure 2.26).

7. Look straight ahead and maintain a fierce gaze in front of you. Hold the position for three to five breaths and then drop your arms to your sides, straighten your legs and pivot your feet to the left side. Repeat Warrior II to the left.

8. Come out of the pose and stand at the front of your mat.

Yoga for You

Yoga for You

Learn About The Healing Art Of Yoga. We need to give more importance to our health and the treatment of diseases. A big number of medicines treat only the symptoms of the disease, and not the base cause. As a matter of fact, the cause of a lot of chronic ailments is still being researched.

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