Standing postures

The standing postures tend to be the most physical part of a program. If you're doing a 30-minute routine, you usually have time for three or four standing postures. In a 60-minute program, you may have as many as six or seven standing asanas. You can choose any of the standing postures from Chapter 7 for this portion of your routine.

As a general rule back bends, twists, and side bends (the hallmarks of many standing postures) come before forward bends. Therefore, you want to include standing forward bends after most of the standing postures you choose.

Figure 15-17 shows you examples of standing postures for a 30- or 60-minute program. As an alternative, you can choose the dynamic kneeling or standing sequence (sun salutation) or the standing rejuvenation sequence for beginners from Chapter 13. The dynamic postures take the place of three to six standing postures, depending on which sequence you choose and how many rounds you do. When you select a dynamic sequence, try to allow time at the end for one twist and one compensating forward bend. We mention this note because all our dynamic sequences are forward and backward bends only.

If you want your routine to be more physically challenging, simply do two sets of the standing postures.

Figure 15-17:

Examples of popular standing postures.

Figure 15-17:

Examples of popular standing postures.

Lessons In Gnagi Yoga

Lessons In Gnagi Yoga

This book is a beautiful explanation of Yogi Philosophy. Everything about Hindu philosophy for the non-Eastern reader. It talks about nature, forces and reason. The Yogi Philosophy and its several branches or fields are presented with great detail.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment