Akaimi Of Hatha Yuca

left hip and at the same time stretching the hands out in front and back palms down, and making blades of the hands and fingers. Keep the arms forearms, and shoulders in a single line, and look toward the right ham (fig. 7.19).

There are three musts in this posture: keep all the muscles of tl, extremities firm; keep the torso straight and perpendicular to the floe rather than leaned forward; and don't flex the front knee more than 90 To complete the posture in its ideal form, the right leg should be perpendicul; and the right thigh parallel to the floor. As your capacity for lowering yoi weight improves, you will have to widen your stance so that the right kn< does not push out too far. Hold the feet as fiat as possible, being careful n< to raise the lateral edge of the left foot. Repeat in the opposite direction

This is a good posture for beginners and those in poor physical conditit because it can be modified to meet everyone's personal needs. All you ha to do to make it easier is start with a narrower stance, swivel as in the fi 1 posture, and lower your weight until the leg is perpendicular to the flo Go back and forth from one side to the other, and over a period of weeks r months gradually widen your stance. As soon as you reach the poini t which your front thigh is parallel to the floor (and the front leg perpendicu r. as usual), and as soon as you can do this in both directions while keep g the torso erect, you have arrived at the full posture.

As you come into the posture, hyperextension of the left hip joint tighti is its spiral of iliofemoral, pubofemoral, and ischiofemoral ligaments (fig •) at the same time that flexion of the right hip unwinds its same th e ligaments and allows the head of the femur the freedom needed to rot e in the acetabulum. Doing the posture in the opposite direction will rev« e these situations, tightening the spiral in the right hip joint and looser g it on the left.

This is an elementary but at the same time complex pose. The twi is accomplished by swivelling at the hip joints in one direction and twist ig the chest back in the other direction. With the shoulders facing the s a. and with the head facing the outreaching hand, the neck will also hav to be twisted 90°. Finally, because the pelvis is at a 20-30° angle from he shoulders, the hyperextended rear thigh forces it into a forward till I at creates a moderate sidebending posture. To ease the tension with res| ft to the rear thigh, beginning students often minimize side bending by lear ig forward instead of keeping their torso upright. This looks unseemly, howe r: it is better to compromise the posture with a narrower stance and less flo >n of the front leg and thigh. When students do not try to lower their wei it into the full posture prematurely, the demands on the pelvis for side beni ig will not be so urgent, they can remain upright without difficulty, and ie posture becomes relatively easy.

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The standing warrior II pose strengthens and stretches muscles throughout the lower extremities, especially the hip flexors and knee extensors. Facing the right, the right quadriceps femoris muscles and the left psoas and iliacus muscles are stretched to whatever limits you are exploring as they lengthen eccentrically, support the posture, and lower your weight. Everything is reversed when you face the left.

The next variation of the standing warrior (warrior I) is more demanding. Begin as in the previous posture, but in this one turn the rear foot in about 20' instead of 10C, lift the hands overhead with the palms together, and pull them to the rear. Swivel the hips around so the head, chest, and abdomen face the front thigh squarely. When this is accomplished, the pelvis will be rotated all the way around and will approach a 90° angle with respect to the thighs (figs. 1.2 and 7.20). Repeat on the other side.

Because the pelvis now faces the front, and because the rear leg and thigh are perpendicular to the torso, the rear thigh is more acutely hyper-extended than in the previous posture. And since you are still keeping the figure 7.20. The standing warrior I is more demanding than the warrior II pose, because you swivel the pelvis (insofar as possible) 90" to face the front knee, and because hyperextension of the rear thigh produces the need for a sharp backbend. For an even more demanding posture, extend the head and neck to the rear and face the ceiling (fig. 1.2). As in the case of the the warrior II pose, beginners should compromise by keeping the leg perpendicular to the floor and by not dropping their weight so far.

Warrior Pose

figure 7.20. The standing warrior I is more demanding than the warrior II pose, because you swivel the pelvis (insofar as possible) 90" to face the front knee, and because hyperextension of the rear thigh produces the need for a sharp backbend. For an even more demanding posture, extend the head and neck to the rear and face the ceiling (fig. 1.2). As in the case of the the warrior II pose, beginners should compromise by keeping the leg perpendicular to the floor and by not dropping their weight so far.

422 anatomy oh hatha foc.a torso upright, the only way you can adapt to the extra hip hyperextension is with a lumbar backbond. Therefore, as you come into the pose you should create a whole-body feeling by strongly lilting the hands overheat and pulling them to the rear, thus lifting the rib cage and chest, drawing the shoulders back and down, and taking excess tension off the lower back To make the spirit of spinal extension complete, you can also extend th neck enough to look toward the ceiling {fig. 1.2). As with the previou posture, beginning students can also make this one easier by narrowin their stance and not lowering so far toward the ideal position. Everyoi should breathe deeply, expanding the chest as much as possible and inhalii their full inspiratory capacity.

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