Circulation

Circulation and respiration go hand in hand. When athletes speak of cardie respiratory fitness they are talking about both functions: getting air infi the lungs and transferring oxygen from the lungs to the tissues of the bod (chapter 2). Inverting the body affects these processes profoundly and i different ways depending on the specific posture. We'll look at six posture that Ulustrate some of the differences: the headstand, the shoulderstan« the inverted action posture, the lifted shoulderstand, stage one of the plo lying with the chest almost flat, and stage three of the plow with the fe pulled fully overhead.

Like the headstand, the shoulderstand and related postures chain blo< i and excess fluids from the lower extremities and abdominopelvic orgai and for this reason they are excellent practices for anyone with varici e veins or sluggish circulation in the lower half of the body. The effects 1 circulation in the head and neck, however, are different and more compl x in the shoulderstand than they are in the headstand (fig. 9.15). The mi t obvious point of contrast is that blood pressure in the head is lower in t e shoulderstand because the vertical distance between the heart and e brain is only a few inches, while it is roughly 12-16 inches in the headsta 1, depending on your body type. If we calculate that average blood press e in the brain during the headstand is around 130 mm Hg (figs. 8.2 and 9 ,)

Figure 9.14. The lifted plow is a special pleasure for those whose flexibility cannot quite accomodate to the classic plow. Here the shoulders are support I by two, 2.5 inch mats combined. This is not as much of a balancing posture a> the lifted shoulderstand because the feet reach the floor, but there is still a tendency for the uninitiated student to tip over in a backward somersault.

Figure 9.14. The lifted plow is a special pleasure for those whose flexibility cannot quite accomodate to the classic plow. Here the shoulders are support I by two, 2.5 inch mats combined. This is not as much of a balancing posture a> the lifted shoulderstand because the feet reach the floor, but there is still a tendency for the uninitiated student to tip over in a backward somersault.

9 the shotide/tstand 525

instead of the 100 mm Hg (average) at chest level, we can estimate that blood pressure in the brain during the shoulderstand will be more like an average of 110 mm Hg (fig. 9.15).

It is obvious that blood pressure in the head decreases in the shoulder-stand in comparison with the headstand, but the situation in the neck is a separate question. One might expect a decrease in blood pressure here as well, and for the same reason—because in the shoulderstand, the neck is not as far below the heart as it is in the headstand. This is not, however, borne out experientially. Unlike the headstand, when you are in the classic shoulderstand there is a localized sensation of extra, rather than reduced, pressure and tension in the neck. Exactly what these sensations mean has not been tested in the clinic or laboratory, but the lore in hatha yoga is that some of the major arteries supplying the brain are slightly occluded in the shoulderstand because of the severe flexion in the neck. And if that is what happens, constrictions in those major arteries could cause increased blood pressure in any nearby region that is supplied by arteries that branch off just before the hypothesized constriction.

Spartans Routine

Spartans Routine

Fitness is the biggest issue of todays society because technology has improvised our lives so much that people do not move a lot and this lazy working routine and tiring mind works make people unfit physically.

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