Diaphragmatic Breathing In Sitting Postures

To experience the center-of-the-trunk sensation that characteriz-diaphragmatic breathing in sitting postures, sit upright in a chair and fi review abdominal breathing as a basis for comparison. Then to breati diaphragmatically, inhale gently while holding just enough tension in li abdominal muscles to make sure that the lower abdomen is not displat ,1 anteriorly during inhalation. There is a sense of enlargement in the low part of the chest and a feeling of expansion in the upper part of t abdomen just below the sternum. The lateral excursion of the rib cage (I 2.25a) is more pronounced than the anterior movement (fig. 2.25b), butyi 1 may have to take a few slow, deep inhalations to confirm this.

All of these observations will be lost on chest breathers because tl difference between the mild lower abdominal tension that creat« diaphragmatic breathing and the frank rigidity of the entire abdomii; 1 wall that is associated with constricted thoracic breathing is far too subt for them to feel and comprehend. They will get mixed up every time. discussed earlier, anyone who has the habit of chronic chest breathir. should not try to do thoraco-diaphragmatic breathing until they ha\ become thoroughly habituated to abdominal breathing. Their first gt must be to break the habit of constricted chest breathing forever.

Figure 2.24. Objectively, this beginner's crocodile posture again appears to lift the lower back and hips as in abdomino-diaphragmatic breathing, but appearances can be deceiving. The subjective feel of the posture is that the mild back-bending position severely restricts lifting of the lower back; more emphasis is felt at the base of the rib cage. For that reason, and because the extreme arm position also restricts thoracic breathing, this posture is admirably suited for training in thoraco-diaphragmatic breathing.

inhalation inhalation

Figure 2.24. Objectively, this beginner's crocodile posture again appears to lift the lower back and hips as in abdomino-diaphragmatic breathing, but appearances can be deceiving. The subjective feel of the posture is that the mild back-bending position severely restricts lifting of the lower back; more emphasis is felt at the base of the rib cage. For that reason, and because the extreme arm position also restricts thoracic breathing, this posture is admirably suited for training in thoraco-diaphragmatic breathing.

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