S The Headstand

right and left trapezius triceps brachii spine of scapula deltoid hand and wrist extensors

Abductors Triceps Deltoid Gluteus

Achilles tendon gastrocnemius

Figure 8.10. Superficial muscles of •be body 'Posterior v'ew; Heck)

Achilles tendon right and left trapezius hand and wrist extensors hamstrings: biceps femoris. semitendinosus, semimembranosus gastrocnemius

Figure 8.10. Superficial muscles of •be body 'Posterior v'ew; Heck)

triceps brachii spine of scapula deltoid sternocfeidomastoid clavicle pectoralis minor serratus f igure 8.11. Intermediate layer of muscles (anterior view; Herk)

Muscles Anterior View

har and rist fie*1 s sternocfeidomastoid clavicle pectoralis minor serratus coracobrachit subscapt is biceps bi :,hii har and rist fie*1 s quadrtceps t( vastus mec'i vastus intern vastus lateral distal segme rectus femori (most of the cut away to i vastus interi

lius, and of iter is zeal lius)

f igure 8.11. Intermediate layer of muscles (anterior view; Herk)

levator scapulae rhomboids teres minor splenius capitis supraspinatus infraspinatus teres major serratus anterior triceps brachii

levator scapulae rhomboids teres minor splenius capitis supraspinatus infraspinatus teres major serratus anterior triceps brachii

Teres Minor Anterior View

semitendinosus is cut away on right side to reveal full width and length of semi membranosus

- gastrocnemius (cut away: distal stumps shown)

- Achilles tendon

Figure 8.12. '"termediate layer of Muscles (posterior v'ew, Heck)

hamstrings: semimembranosus biceps lemons, semitendinosus semitendinosus is cut away on right side to reveal full width and length of semi membranosus

Figure 8.12. '"termediate layer of Muscles (posterior v'ew, Heck)

- gastrocnemius (cut away: distal stumps shown)

- Achilles tendon

Scalenes Tendon

rectus sheath (empty)

iliacus promontory N&S of sacrum X

greater trochanter adductors clavicle longus colli scalenes subscapularis, stabilizes head of humerus in glenoid cavity bones of forearm pronated: radius, and ulna biceps bracl" short head jt). and long he 1

coracobract alis belly of biceps bi chii transvc sus abdor lis sup iter patella

Figure 8.13. Deep muscles of the body (anterior view; Heck)

H IUI- HEADSTANn ¡fej

Abductors Triceps Deltoid Gluteus

spine of scapula inferior ant of scapula major semispinals quadratus lumborum greatef trochanter gluteus minimus adductors popliteus

muscles body 'rior view;

clavicle semispinalis capitis

Four of these seven muscles—the teres minor, the supraspinatus, the infraspinatus (figs. 1.1, 1.13, and 8.12), and the subscapularis (figs. 1.13, 2.8 and 8.13)—form the well-known and important rotator cuff, which stabilizes the head of the humerus in the glenoid cavity (figs. 1.13 and 8.13). Without these, the action of other powerful muscles such as the pectoralis major an< latissimus dorsi would quickly dislocate the shoulder. The rotator cuf muscles, in addition to acting from the scapula to the humerus, can also ai in the opposite direction—from the arm to the scapula—assisting tl trapezius, rhomboids, levator scapulae, pectoralis minor, and serrati anterior in stabilizing the scapula from one of the many fixed arm positior in the headstand and other inverted postures.

THE FOREARM, WRIST, AND HAND

The muscles that act throughout the rest of the upper extremity are ea to envision. The biceps brachii originates from the front of the arm a I inserts on the forearm (figs. 1.1, 8.8-9, 8-". and 8.13); its action is to flex t elbow concentrically, or resist its extension eccentrically. It is this mui that powerfully resists extension of the forearm as you come forward 11 o the peacock posture (fig. 3.23d). The triceps brachii originates from t e back of the arm and inserts on the olecranon (figs, t.i, 8.9-10, and 8.1 ); it acts to extend the elbow and resist its flexion. In the headstand it lin s forearm flexion, and in the scorpion it contracts isometrically, keeping ie elbows from collapsing (fig. 8.31). Other muscles in the forearm supii e (fig. fl.13) and pronate (fig. 8.8) the forearm. Movements of the wri s, hands, and fingers are accomplished by flexors on the anterior side of ie forearm and hand (fig. 8.11), and by extensors on the posterior side ot ie forearm and hand (fig. 8.10). The flexors are activated any time you r ke a fist or plant your hands on the floor for postures such as the down-f lg dog (figs. 6.17 and 8.26), the upward-facing dog (figs. 5.13-14), or the p ik posture (fig. 6.1(1).

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Responses

  • livio
    What muscles are concentric in headstand?
    7 years ago

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