Twisting In The Standing Warriors

The standing warrior postures are named for their wide-bodied, powei ul-looking stances. They speak for themselves. Although the two posti es

7. twistihc postl'rks 419

shown here are not ordinarily classified with twists, careful analysis reveals some twisting in both of them. In relation to a frontal plane in the anatomical position, the first posture (warrior II in Iyengar's classification) exhibits a 20-30° twist in the pelvis, a 20-30° countertwist in the upper body, and a 90° twist in the neck; the second posture (warrior I in Iyengar's classification) exhibits a 90° twist in the pelvis.

To come into the warrior II posture, stand with the feet 3-4 feet apart, and swivel the pelvis 20-30° to the right. This is accomplished automatically by turning the right foot 90° to the right and the left foot 10° to the right. The right side of the pelvis will move slightly posterior in relation to the left as you adjust the feet, so this will give you a different feeling from the triangle, in which you try to keep the hips in line and facing the front. Stretch the arms and forearms out so they are in line with the shoulders and the lower extremities. Since the pelvis is swiveled 20-30° to the right, the arms and shoulders will end up twisted 20-30' back to the left. Then lower your weight, flexing the right knee and hip while hyperextcnding the

Figure 7.19. The standing warrior II is a fairly natural pose in which several kinds pf twists make themselves apparent: about 25° in the pelvis, a 25° countertwist ■n the upper body, and a 90° twist in the neck. Aim in the final posture to keep 'he front leg perpendicular to the floor as a first priority, so as not to thrust the knee beyond the ankle. Then widen your stance and drop your weight (as strength and flexibility permit) until the front thigh is parallel to the floor. Keep 'he upper body upright, leaned neither forward nor backward. Beginners should compromise by not dropping their weight so far and adjusting their foot Position so the leg is still perpendicular to the floor and the thigh angles up toward the pelvis.

Figure 7.19. The standing warrior II is a fairly natural pose in which several kinds pf twists make themselves apparent: about 25° in the pelvis, a 25° countertwist ■n the upper body, and a 90° twist in the neck. Aim in the final posture to keep 'he front leg perpendicular to the floor as a first priority, so as not to thrust the knee beyond the ankle. Then widen your stance and drop your weight (as strength and flexibility permit) until the front thigh is parallel to the floor. Keep 'he upper body upright, leaned neither forward nor backward. Beginners should compromise by not dropping their weight so far and adjusting their foot Position so the leg is still perpendicular to the floor and the thigh angles up toward the pelvis.

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