Shapes of bones

Shapes Bones

virabhadrasanci II

The form or shape of a bone reflects its function. Long bones provide leverage, flat bones provide protection and a place for broad muscles to attach, and short bones provide for weight bearing functions.

Yoga accesses each bone's particular potential, using long bones to leverage the body deeper into postures, the flat bones (and their accompanying core muscles) for stability, and the short vertebral bodies to bear weight. Examples of these bones are illustrated here.

Flat Bones The BodyPosition Yoga

Gravity and the Skeleton

The Sanscrit word for a yoga pose is asana. Sanscrit scholars variously translate this word to mean "a comfortable or effortless position". Yoga postures approach effortlessness when we align the long axis of the bones with the direction of gravity. This decreases the muscular force needed to maintain our postures.

For example, in utthanasana, the force of gravity aligns with the long axis of the femur and tibia bones. Similarly, in siddhasana the force of gravity aligns with the long axis of the spine.

Use muscular force to bring the bones into a position where they carry the load. Once these positions are attained, muscular force is no longer necessary (or greatly decreased).

utthanasana siddhasana

SiddhasanaFundamental Bones

Fundamental Bones femur patella fibula tibia clavicle scapula sternum humerus radius ulna ilium sacrum pubis

Fundamental

Bones

Talus Lateral Trochlea

phalanges carpals radius radial head trochlea lateral epicondyle medial epicondyle olecranon metacarpals

Carpals Metacarpals Phalanges

phalanges metacarpals carpals radius radial head trochlea lateral epicondyle medial epicondyle olecranon

Medial Tuberosity Calcaneus

hindfoot midfoot forefoot

(calcaneus,talus) (tarsals) (metatarsals, phalanges)

hindfoot midfoot forefoot

(calcaneus,talus) (tarsals) (metatarsals, phalanges)

glenoid humeral head greater tuberosity lesser tuberosity bicipital groove

Bicipital Groove MusclesFunction Ischial Tuberosity

ischial tuberosity

The hips and shoulders are ball and socketjoints. Their form reflects their function in that the deep socket (acetabulum) of the hip is designed to support weight while the shallow socket (glenoid) of the shoulder is designed to provide maximum range of motion for the arms. Yoga postures balance mobility and stability by increasing the range of motion of the hips and stabilizing the shoulder.

Shoulder and Hip acetabulum

, .. acromion femoral head glenoid greater trochanter humeral head greater tuberosity lesser tuberosity bicipital groove ischial tuberosity shoulder

A Guide To Practice Yoga

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Responses

  • pauli lampen
    How are the shapes of bones related to their function?
    7 years ago
  • massawa
    Where is the bicipital groove?
    7 years ago
  • rudigar
    Which muscles used in siddhasana?
    1 year ago

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